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Passaic County Historic Sites

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Historic Sites

Dey Mansion Washington's Headquarters, Wayne
PassaicCounty-306The Dey Mansion located in  Preakness Valley Park was listed on the State and National Registers of Historic Places in 1972. Under the direction of the Passaic County Board of Chosen Freeholders, the staff at Dey Mansion are dedicated to preserving and interpreting the history of the Dey Family and the important role that their home played as General George Washington’s Headquarters during the summer and fall of 1780. Through tours, lectures, and special events the Dey Mansion promotes the exploration of life in Colonial America, the events and people of the American Revolution, and the need and importance of historic preservation. Please visit the Dey Mansion’s website www.deymansion.org for more information.

John W. Rea House, Hawthorne

250px-Rea_HouseThe John W. Rea House located in Goffle Brook Park was listed on the State and National Registers of Historic Places in 1999.  Originally built as a private residence in c. 1810 by Henry Doremus, it features traditional Dutch Colonial Architecture that is reflective of the time period and geographic area. The Rea house changed hands a number of times; becoming a tavern in 1920 and a local Boy's Club Headquarters before it was converted to permanent County office space in 1967. The County used the Rea house as offices until 1999. Today the Rea house is slated for a complete rehabilitation, with completion expected in December 2018. Under the direction of the Department of Cultural & Historic Affairs, the Rea House will be used as a new County-wide art center with gallery and classroom spaces.


Lambert Castle, Paterson


lambert-castle-spoon-museum-paterson-njLambert Castle was listed on the New Jersey Register in 1975 and the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. Lambert Castle is owned by the County of Passaic and operated by the Passaic County Historical Society, a non-profit corporation established in 1926, who continues to use the building as a museum and library. For more information about Lambert Castle please visit the Passaic County Historical Society’s website: Lambert Castle & PCHS


Lambert Tower, Paterson/Woodland Park

Lambert TowerLocated in Garret Mountain Reservation, the 70 ft. tall Lambert Tower was built in 1896 by Catholina Lambert. Along with Lambert Castle, the structure was built reminiscent of the castles in Great Britain were Catholina Lambert spent his childhood. The tower was open to visitors throughout the 1930s but was used by the military as a lookout for enemy aircraft during World War II. In 2014, thanks to a partnership between Passaic County and New Jersey's Green Acres Program, Lambert Tower observation deck re-opened to the public. Visitors are able to enjoy spectacular views of New York from Bear Mountain to the North, along the New York City skyline, and all the way south to Sandy Hook, NJ. For more information about visiting Lambert Tower, and inquiries about special events, please contact the Department of Cultural & Historic Affairs.

Vanderhoef-Westervelt House, Clifton
Vanderhoef HouseThe Vanderhoef-Westervelt House, located in Weasel Brook Park is one of the oldest buildings in Passaic County and is the oldest County owned facility. The structure was built c. 1720 as the home of Gilbert Vanderhoef, owner, and operator of the County second oldest gristmill. Although the property changed hands a number of times it continued to be operated as a grist mill until 1897. The Vanderhoef-Westervelt house is undergoing a complete restoration, slated to be finished August 2018. Once complete, the house will serve as an extension to both the Departments of Cultural & Historic Affairs and Parks & Recreation. They will permit the use of the building as meeting space for various organizations, as well as house exhibitions on the history of Clifton, Passaic County, and Weasel Brook Park. In addition, the Departments will provide educational and recreational programs throughout the year. For more information on the restoration of the Westervelt-Vanderhoef house, or its uses, please contact the Department of Cultural & Historic Affairs.